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Tips & Tools for the Art of Experiential Group Facilitation, Second Edition

Jennifer Stanchfield, MS

The second edition of Tips & Tools eclipses the first with insights gained from another decade of experience in group facilitation and new information coming from the emerging field of educational neuroscience. As a result the ideas and methods focused on active engagement, ownership in learning, and facilitating meaningful reflection have been greatly expanded. The layout of information is more effective—experiential theory and perspectives, hands-on activities, and teachable moments flow from one chapter to the next—making this edition an essential resource for practicing and teaching the art of experiential group facilitation.

Rediscovering Dewey: A Reflection on Independent Thinking

Steven Simpson

John Dewey believed in education, and he believed in American participatory democracy. Simpson uses personal anecdotes, Dewey’s extensive writings, and even Chinese legends to discuss Dewey’s ideas about teaching democracy, independent thinking, and a sense of community. They are as relevant today as when they were written.

Adventure and the Way of Jesus: An Experiential Approach to Spiritual Formation

Greg Robinson, PhD

What things are best suited to help others grow spiritually, and what equipment is at the disposal of the spiritual facilitator?” Spiritual facilitators help others through their own presence, the conditions they create and maintain, and the effective use of questions to point, nudge, direct, and teach those who want to learn. One of the best contexts for discovery is experiential learning. This is a type of learning that requires action, reflection, and an undetermined result. In a word, spiritual formation requires adventure.

The Processing Pinnacle: An Educator’s Guide to Better Processing

Steven Simpson
Dan Miller
Buzz Bocher

Easy to implement and conversational in tone, The Processing Pinnacle contains valuable guidance for anyone who teaches or facilitates experientially. The authors offer a theoretical approach to more effective processing, the reflective component of experience. Utilizing the metaphor of the mountain, they demonstrate how and when certain facilitator methods may elicit immediate response and make a lasting impression on the individual, encouraging reflection as a personal response to life experience.

The Leader Who Is Hardly Known: Self-less Teaching From the Chinese Tradition

Steven Simpson, PhD

Taoist philosophy can have deep meaning for experiential educators because of the focus on natural spontaneity and unself-conscious learning and teaching. This series of essays emphasizes personality traits that affect leadership, commonalities to experiential education programs, then the necessity of connection to the natural world. They are intentionally short and can stand alone for reference and guidance. The conclusion summarizes how the principles form a foundational philosophy for experiential education.

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